Archives for category: Uniqueness

In search of inspiration today, I browsed.

This post by Ev Brogue (featuring Gwen Bell) hit me squarely between the eyes. Comments were unfortunately closed – I wanted to add my standing ovation – so instead let me share here why I like it so much…

Ev’s words “When I’m not experience telling, I’m bullshitting” resonate and transport me directly to my first ‘proper’ speech: a breakfast meeting of local businessmen. My material was appropriate, I was professional and succinct, even entertaining!

But the material wasn’t ‘me’.

It was information and facts and tidbits I had picked up from books, seminars, meetings, audio programmes. I wasn’t ‘telling’ from my own experience.

Contrast that with the blog posts I have found most difficult to write. They all relate to my 2300km solo trek. They were to do with my experiences with decision-making, and finances, and health.

They included information that was hard for me to share. They made me feel vulnerable and ‘less than’. They were knocking on the “I’m a failure” door.

Yet every single one of those posts brought a response that showed I had hit a nerve for my readers. It seems I wasn’t the only one to struggle with those darker feelings.

Raw honesty rewarded me with deeper human connection.

It felt good.

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A new acquaintance asked me today what it is I do for a living.

I struggled to answer.

Fumbling and mumbling and stuttering I tried to explain how “I can coach people, and deliver development workshops and training, give after-dinner speeches, act as a master of ceremonies for conferences and sometimes I help small businesses with their marketing communication or where-to-from-here strategy thinking, and can run team-building-with-impact programmes… oh, and I have executive board experience and have been interviewed on TV and my writing has been published in books, magazines, newpapers and online.”

Not exactly a succinct reply, huh? I was embarrassed at how wishy-washy and muddled I was sounding. Granted it was a Sunday, but even so!

Trying to escape, I bounced the question back at him.

“I’m a family lawyer,” he said.

Oh. Four words and I ‘get’ what he does. Nicely labelled, fitting perfectly in the box called ‘law’.

I’ve tried in the past to tell people what solution I provide: “I help parents and teens get on better” or “I move people closer to their potential” or “I help teams understand how their diversity can actually be a strength.” But it’s still a bit vague, non-concrete, fuzzy.

As much as I love doing lots of different things and having skills in a wide range of areas, today I wish I could – in one breath – explain ‘what’ I do.

Or at least get closer to describing the value I provide.

<sigh>

Following on from yesterday’s post, I have an admission to make…

I feel a bit despondent when I find someone already doing something I thought would be an awesome thing for me to do.

Crazy, huh?

Here are two examples:

Wellingtonian Michael Moore-Jones is the teenage brainchild behind this inspiring video-rich site. He’s even got both the Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition to answer the question: “What is one thing that they didn’t teach you in school, but that you wish you had known when you were younger?” Brilliant.

Scott Dinsmore makes me want to get off the couch and go walking again! A recent post on this site asks 57 living legends (from Seth Godin to Simon Sinek, JD Roth to Jim Cathcart) to describe ‘the moment’ that defined their passion. Fascinating and diverse.

So now I take a deep breath and pause for a moment. Surely just because someone else has kicked off something doesn’t mean I can’t do it too? I’m bound to do it differently, after all.

Then I consider why I love this Hugh Macleod cartoon so much. It resonates with me and make me swell with Y-E-S!

Perhaps I could benefit from redefining my take on “the only one”…

Stay tuned.

It’s been over three months since I stopped walking the length of New Zealand along the Te Araroa trail, due to injury and dangerous weather conditions. A trek of 2300km feels enough (to me anyway) to call the adventure ‘done’.

In those three months I have dealt with a vast array of emotions. And decisions, including trying to answer ‘Now what?’

The MyAdventurePlus blog no longer attracts me – I’m not that guy any more (whoever he was in the first place). I have decided to start afresh, in the hope that a new beginning will once again allow my thoughts to flow. I’ve missed that release…

I aim to keep it super-simple. I don’t know where it will take me.

If you want to come along for the ride, feel free.