Archives for posts with tag: school

I’ve broken lots of ‘rules’.

I’ve not stuck to one job since leaving school. I’m paring down my possessions to only my most loved / most useful / most used. I don’t go shopping for the sake of shopping…

I’ve trained, retrained, started a business, stopped a business, started another one, trained again, had numerous jobs and contracts…

I’ve followed passions. I’ve read books and watched movies when work deadlines were looming. I’ve walked kilometres just for the hell of it. I’ve left the house to dance without doing the dishes first. I rarely make my bed in the morning…

Hardly the poster-child of obedience!

In his post “Confusing obedience with self-control” Seth Godin points out the danger of being obedient:

“We organize our schools around obedience. Tests, comportment, the very structure of the day is about training young people to follow instructions.

We organize our companies around obedience as well. From the resume we use to hire to the training programs to the annual budgets, revenue targets and reviews we create, the model employee is someone who does what he’s told.”

I don’t believe I’m the most self-controlled person around (especially when it comes to potato chips and chocolate!) but I’m doing my best to be more aware of when I’m unconsciously obedient, when it may not actually be beneficial to me.

According to Seth,

“Self-control is without a doubt one of the building blocks of success, a key element of any career worth talking about. We need self-control if we’re going to make a difference.”

Is self-control the difference between doing what’s important instead of just the urgent?

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Answer me this: what percentage of secondary school students do you believe are bored by their weekday routine?

  • If students are bored, they’re unmotivated to be in class.
  • If they’re unmotivated to be in class, they will never rush to get out of bed and into their day.
  • If they’re uninspired by their day, will they enthusiastically follow their passion?
  • And if they don’t follow their passion, are they destined to hate their eventual employment, joining the burgeoning mass of ‘I would rather be anywhere than here’ workers?

Seth Godin raises a great question in this post:

“Here’s the question every parent and taxpayer needs to wrestle with: Are we going to applaud, push or even permit our schools (including most of the private ones) to continue the safe but ultimately doomed strategy of churning out predictable, testable and mediocre factory-workers?”

…and he finishes with:

“The post-industrial revolution is here. Do you care enough to teach your kids to take advantage of it?”

What do you reckon? Is a no-longer-relevant system (with an output of ‘bored kids’) a contributing factor for tagging, shoplifting, unemployment, suicide, violence…?

What will it take for the system to change?